programme

Health

Home/ Health
Course TypeCourse CodeNo. Of Credits
Foundation ElectiveNA4

Semester and Year Offered: 3rd Semester, 2010

Course Coordinator and Team: Shubhra Nagalia

Email of course coordinator: shubhra@aud.ac.n

Pre-requisites: All students should be registered for the course

Course Objectives/Description:

The course is about unpacking and critically understanding the concept of health. It looks at health as our subjective histories, social and historical level. It will enable students to ask questions such as what happens when the concepts of normality and abnormality extends its judgment to behaviour, life style and mental health? Medicine and medical practice can then become both caring and controlling. The course aims to study questions of health, norms, knowledge production, and institutions through the ways they are produced by and produce selves and marginality.

The course equips Humanities and Science students to study questions of health, norms, knowledge production, and institutions through the ways they are produced by and produce selves and marginality. Students will be trained to problematise modern medicine, feminist critique and resistance to medical practices and knowledge. It will give an overview of critical issues in public health and will foreground women, especially the more vulnerable strata of women, to mark an entry point into debates around science, modern medicine, illness, well-being and offer critiques and alternatives to the current challenges of envisioning a people oriented health care system.

Course Outcomes:

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. Identify key conceptual terms in the study of ‘Health’
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of key texts and topics related to Health
  3. Use written and oral skills to apply on an academic argument
  4. Demonstrate an awareness of critical skills required to read a range of texts
  5. Apply research skills to source materials for class presentations and assessment tasks

Brief description of modules/ Main modules:

  1. The Concept of Health: This unit will look at the concept called ‘health.’ It will critically ask if dominant definition of ‘health’ is the absence of disease or our personal history and medical conditions or about where we come from and who we are.
  2. Health as Biosocial: In continuation with previous unit the course asks how do policies judge, address, and repair the 'health of the society?' Modern medicine’s promise of curing all that is pathological or dysfunctional has enabled a certain way of understanding the human body. Medicine and medical practice can then become both caring and controlling.
  3. Social Determinants of Health: Does Health vary by age, gender, caste, or race? Would we study health at a social and historical level? It will train students to look at the ways in which the health of certain populations – like women, gay men, and the poor – comes to be tied to their subjection and the continuation of structures of power/knowledge.
  4. Ethics of Care: The course will, from the point of view of ethics of care, give an overview of critical issues in public health and will foreground women, especially the more vulnerable strata of women, to mark an entry point into debates around science, modern medicine, illness, well-being and offer critiques and alternatives to the current challenges of envisioning a people oriented health care system. It will look at ways in which bio-medical discourse produces race, gender, caste and class and differentially structures women and men’s experiences of health.

 

Assessment Details with weights:

Assessment 1 of 30% weightage: A paper of 3000 words on the first unit.

Assessment 2 of 30% weightage: Team (5-6 students per team) presentation on Unit 2.

Assessment 3 of 40% weightage: Term paper of 5000 words on Units 3 and 4.

Reading List:

  1. Judith Butler (1993), Bodies That Matter, Preface (pg ix-xii) and Introduction (pg 1-23), Routledge, NY, London.
  2. Michel Foucault (1978), „Right of Death and Power over Life from History of Sexuality, Vol. 1, Pantheon Books, New York, (pg 135-159).
  3. Jeffery, Patricia and Roger Jeffery (2010), Only when the boat has started sinking: A maternal death in rural north India, Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 71, pp. 1711-1718.
  4. Banerji, Nirmala and Jain, Devaki (2001), “Indian Sex Ratio through time and space: Development from Women's Perspective”, in Mazumdar, Veena and Krishnaji, N. (ed.). Enduring Conundrum: India's Sex Ratio: Essays in Honour of Asok Mitra, Delhi, Rainbow, pp 73-119. (CWDS/AUD library)(Team Reading)
  5. Jay Prosser, „Skin Memories from Sara Ahmed ed Thinking Through The Skin, Routledge, NY, London, pg 52-68.
  6. Satya's letter to Angelina Jolie (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/sunday-times/deep-focus/A-letter-to-Angelina-Jolie-by-an-Indian-Transman/articleshow/20389952.cms)
  7. Swatija, M & Shah, C. (1996) ' Towards a New Perspective on Women's Bodies. Learning and Unlearning Together,' EPW, Vol XXXI, Nos. 16 and 17, April 20-27, pp WS 35-38.
  8. Susie Tharu et al., Towards a Critical Medical Practice, Introduction
  9. Ulrich Beck (1992), Risk Society, Introduction and Preface, Sage Publications, London, pg 3-16.
  10. Mary Douglas and Aaron Wildavsky (1983), Risk and Culture, Risks are Hidden, University of California Press, LA, London, pg 16-28.
  11. Peter Conrad (2007), „Medicalization: Context, Characteristics, and Changes in The Medicalisation of Society, John Hopkins University Press, US, pg 3-22.
  12. Veena Das and R. Das, Pharmaceuticals in Urban Ecologies in Adriana Petryna et al. ed. Global Pharmaceuticals
  13. Joao Biehl (2005), „Technologies of Invisibility in Jonathan Xavier Inda ed. Anthropologies of Modernity Blackwell Publishing, pg 248-271.
  14. Rama Baru et al. Inequities in Access to Health Services in India, EPW
  15. Didier Fassin (2003), The Embodiment of Inequality, Science and Society, Pg 1-6.
  16. Sarah Hodges ed., Reproductive Health in India, Chapters 1, 2, and 5
  17. Patricia Jeffery et al. Disputing Contraception, Modern Asian Studies
  18. Arlie Hochschild (1983), The Managed Heart, University of California Press, NY, London, pg 76-86/162-184.
  19. Didier Fassin (2008), The Elementary Forms of Care, Social Science & Medicine, pg 262-270.
  20. Ann Cvetkovich (2012), Depression, Duke University Press, Durnham, London, pg 74-84.

 

ADDITIONAL REFERENCE:

  1. Judith Butler, Undoing Gender, Doing Justice to Someone
  2. Nicholas Rose, The Politics of Life Itself, Selections
  3. Lauren Berlant, Slow Death
  4. Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics from Ethics
  5. Roberto Esposito, Immunitas, Selections
  6. Beatriz Preciado, Testo Junkie, Selections
  7. Lawrence Cohen, The Kothi Wars
  8. Ehrenreich, Barbara and Deirdre English (1973) Witches, Midwives and Nurses: A History of Women Healers, New York: The Feminist Press.
  9. Veena Das, Affliction, Chapters 1 and 6
  10. Graham Burchell et al, The Foucault Effect, Chapter 4, 10, 11, and 14.
  11. Douglas Crimp, AIDS Cultural Analysis, Selections
  12. Adriana Petryna et al. ed. Global Pharmaceuticals, Introduction
  13. Joao Biehl, Pharmaceuticalisation
  14. J. Devika, Individuals Households Citizens, Chapter 3
  15. Kumkum Sangari, Solid Liquid, Selections (surrogacy)
  16. Rao, M and Sexton, S (2010) “Introduction: Population, Gender, And Health In Neo-Liberal Times” in Mohan Rao, Sarah Sexton (eds) Markets And Malthus : Population, Gender, And Health In Neo-Liberal Times, Sage Publication, New Delhi, pp. 1-30
  17. Donna Haraway, Encounters with Companion Species
  18. Arlie Hochschild, Global Care Crisis
  19. Didier Fassin et al., At the Heart of the State, Introduction and Conclusion
  20. Annmarie Mol, The Logic of Care, Selections